Genealogy

Fréamh Éireann meets monthly, except July and August, at 10:30 AM on the second Saturday of each month in the O’Keefe Room. We welcome all GAC members, particularly those who need help in their family search or those who don’t know where to start.

As a self-help group, our members support one another by sharing our own research experiences while providing suggestions and guidance.

We do not conduct research for others. Members are kept advised of genealogical seminars and events via meeting minutes and email notices. Periodically guest speakers are invited to address our meetings and field trips are arranged to points of genealogical interest.

Mission

Fréamh Éireann, the Gaelic words for “Irish Roots”, is the name of our genealogy group.  Our interest lies in assisting members of the Fairfield Gaelic – American Club (GAC) interested in researching their family roots.  We focus on, but are not limited to, Irish family research.

Functioning as a self-help group, the members vary in knowledge but all are able to learn from each other by sharing their research experiences, providing suggestions and guidance, identifying resources, programs, and organizational sources that assist in one’s personal research.

We do not conduct research for non-GAC members.

Through our monthly meetings we keep members of Fréamh Éireann advised of various genealogical seminars and events as well as members’ successful searches and/or questions.  Minutes and email notices inform members who may not be able to attend.

Periodically guest speakers are invited to address either our regular meetings or general meetings open to the public.  Occasionally field trips are arranged to points of genealogical interest.

For more information, please email FEsecretarygac@gmail.com.

2015 Fréamh Éireann Officers

Chairman: John Minehan
Vice Chairman: John Mahar
Secretary: Donna Orazio
Membership: Susan Callahan

Fréamh Éireann Member Benefits

  • Learn from each other
  • Opportunity for beginning members to meet one on one with a seasoned member for guidance in their next steps in discovering their family history.
  • Access to our Fréamh Éireann library of materials; minutes including many helpful website addresses
  • Access to the Irish Ordnance Maps
  • Access to the Fréamh Éireann computer
  • As a genealogical society approved by the Secretary of the State of Connecticut, one’s membership card, upon submission, allows access to Town Clerks’ records throughout CT
  • Comradery with others interested in genealogy study particularly of Irish ancestry.
  • Learning genealogy research “tricks” from each other
  • Learning from guest speakers who make presentations periodically at the monthly meetings
  • Priority registration for sponsored open public presentations
  • Made aware of various nearby genealogy presentations by other organizations.

Gene-Meeting-II-5.18.2015

 

Lectures Co-Sponsored by Fréamh Éireann and GAC Language Groups

2011
Plantations, Potatoes and People: The Agricultural Struggles in Eighteenth Century Ireland
A Look at Land Use in the 18th Century
Memory and Commemoration: The Great Irish Famine in America
By: Prof. John Roney, Sacred Heart University & Prof. David Valone, Quinnipiac University

Ancient Ireland and the Development of Celtic Culture and Christianity
By: Prof. John Roney, Sacred Heart University

2012
The World of Cú Chulainn: An Introduction to Early Irish Legends
An introduction to the history, style, and contents of the heroic legends of early medieval Ireland, with emphasis on the great tales of the Ulster Cycle including the epic “Táin Bó Cuailnge” (“Cattle Raid of Cooley”) and the hero Cú Chulainn.
By: Prof. Robert Epstein, Fairfield University

The Abbey: The National Theatre and the Nation
Leading up to Irish Independence in the 1920s, Irish cultural nationalists created institutions that anticipated the establishment of a new state before such was political reality.
Foremost amongst such organizations was the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, whose founders included W.B. Yeats.
By: Prof. Mary Burke, University of Connecticut

2013
History and Current Use of the Irish Language
By: Lisa Nic an Bhreithimh, Fulbright Scholar in Residence, University of Connecticut

Ten-cent Irish on the Newsstand: Irish-American Pulp Fiction & Comic Strips
By: Prof. Christopher Dowd, University of New Haven

Letterfrack
From Hope to Infamy and Regeneration
By: Prof. Irene Whelan, Manhattanville College

2014
Love and Death in Ancient Ireland
Hard Facts and Fabulous Fiction of Romance and Battle in the Warrior Culture of Pre-Christian Ireland
By: CJ May

The CT Irish and Their Contribution to the Civil War
By: Prof.David Koch, Housatonic Community College

Charity and The Great Hunger in Ireland
The extent to which people throughout the world mobilized to provide money, food and clothing to assist the starving Irish
By: Prof. Christine Kineally, Quinnipiac University

2015
The Irish Influence in Latin America
Chronicles of the Irish in Latin American that reveal epic qualities, both from the victim’s and the hero’s standpoint, and the special place the Irish hold in the hearts of many Latin Americans, especially the Mexicans
By: Jack Keogh

The History of Ireland in Song
A Musical History Lesson of Ireland
By: Damien Connolly, All Ireland Musician and Adj. Prof Sacred Heart University